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Looking Good!

acf brochure web

It’s a specialized industry with a select customer base. Much of the business is generated by word of mouth. But when a prospective customer requests more information, it still doesn’t hurt to look good.

We recently designed this sales brochure for ACF Industries, which sells storage tanks for products such as liquefied petroleum gas, gaseous oxygen and other gases that require special handling and secure storage. In their industry, our client explained, the information presented in the brochure is usually provided in a very “vanilla” format. One company’s information doesn’t stand out from the next. They wanted to rise above that.

The brochure design cleanly represents the company’s brand and demonstrates the process and the quality of its products through photography. It provides important information in an easy-to-read layout, using red, white and blue to reinforce their desired message that the product is made in the USA. The piece debuted at a recent trade show in Nashville.

Said Bill Yost, VP of Sales for ACF, “Within our organization, it has been very valuable.”

The White Space Blues

thewhitespacebluesOver many years in this business, we’ve come to recognize something that many of our clients have in common—a fear of white space. Or maybe it’s not so much fear as it is an uncontrollable urge to fill up all available space in their ad, billboard, brochure, e-blast, banner ad, etc. Perhaps it has something to do with a feeling that, since they are paying for the space, some content should occupy it.

It’s not just our clients, though. Many people have the same fear or urge. While we understand it, we vow to never stop fighting for the cause of white space in everything we do.

You see, in design, white space has purpose. Not only does it draw the eye, but it also relieves the eye from relentless clutter. White space gives balance and harmony to layouts. Imagine if you tried to read a printed page with no space between words or lines of copy. Furthermore, very smart people have researched this and found that white space improves the readability and comprehension of printed material.

So, trust us on this. White space is a good thing. And here’s a really good example of white space at work.

Lots of i’s to dot and t’s to cross!

annual report stack web

When we have the opportunity to work with a client on a longer-form piece, such as an annual report, our skill at pulling it all together really shines. The expression ‘The devil is in the details’ is never more true than with a project that spans many months and involves many people.

Take the annual report we recently finished for Holy Spirit—A Geisinger Affiliate. We have worked on Holy Spirit’s annual report for several years. It’s always an interesting and fun project. We start with a detailed production schedule, determining what needs to be done, by when and by whom. Much is involved to complete it: concepts to develop, design ideas to create, layout options to consider, copy to write and edit, photoshoots to art direct, printing to prep for, meetings to coordinate…you get the idea. Through it all, we allow no devils!

Don’t just take our word for it, though. Lori Moran, Holy Spirit’s Director of Public Relations & Marketing, says,

There are a lot of moving parts to a project such as our annual report. I know I can count on TCG to take care of everything, start to finish, concept to printing. I know the project is in good hands.”