Of all the things that might keep you up at night, inconsistency in punctuation of national holidays is likely not one of them. But it does bother some grammarians and a handful of other logical thinkers.

ground hog dayTake Groundhog Day. It’s a day we give a large rodent weather-forecasting power and hope he gets it right. But why isn’t it the possessive Groundhog’s Day? Like Mother’s Day and Father’s Day? The day clearly belongs to the groundhog, as the others belong to mothers and fathers. Which brings up another question. Why aren’t those two days Mothers’ and Fathers’ Day? Or Mothers and Fathers Day? We celebrate all veterans on Veterans Day. Though you may see that noted as Veterans’ Day. Presidents Day is another conundrum. It celebrates a couple of important presidents…it’s their day. So why is it not Presidents’ Day? April Fool’s Day? Now we know there’s more than one fool out there, so why isn’t it April Fools’ Day or April Fools Day?

You get the idea.

However, there is something that’s true of all holidays: In the end, it matters not how you punctuate them, but how you celebrate them!

By the way, did you know that Groundhog Day could have been Badger Day? The German immigrants who came to Pennsylvania brought the tradition from their homeland, where badgers had forecasting prowess. Here they found a plentiful groundhog population, but nary a badger.

The Cheery Grammarian, who is the master of fun facts like these, resides at TCG Advertising & Design and can be found on Twitter, musing about punctuation, grammar, sentence structure, spelling, word origins…all those things you probably paid no attention to in school. Follow at: twitter