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This was fun!

technabotsWe recently were presented with a unique challenge—to create a logo for a team of high school girls competing in robotics. They already had the team name, Technabots, and a mascot of sorts, a gazelle. With that input, we got to work.

The gazelle is the school mascot for Philadelphia High School for Girls. We were told that it is often depicted in a leaping pose, but we went a different route, creating a front-facing view of a “mechanical” gazelle head. Incorporating gears and sprockets and servomechanisms, we came up with several options. The chosen design is shown here.

This is the first time we’ve created a logo using gazelles and gears. It was definitely a different kind of creative challenge—and a whole lot of fun!

And here are the options they had to choose from:

TIFF or GIF or WHAT?

electronic file formatsUse of your logo in different media applications and production platforms requires different file formats. That’s so your logo will look its best, no matter whether it appears in print, online, on TV, or wrapped around the backend of a bus!

Say you’re baking a cake and the recipe calls for flour. You don’t have any flour but you do have cornstarch, so you throw that in instead. The result will be a cake that’s…um…let’s just say less than optimum.

The same holds true for an online ad, a billboard, a printed brochure or any other creative work with your logo. You need the right file format to ensure that your logo looks its best. Here’s an example: the .gif or .jpg format is best for use on the web, while an .eps or .tiff is usually best for print.

Just like the “why did you even start baking a cake without having all the ingredients?” lesson, it’s good to be prepared ahead of time with your logo in all formats. Here’s our easy cheat sheet to help you be ready!

Get our free file format cheat sheet so you can always speak the right language!