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whatever!!

WHATEVER-250x250Once again the good folks at Marist College Institute of Public Opinion have polled Americans about word usage and found that ‘whatever’ has been named the most annoying word—once again!

This particular word has been dubbed the most annoying in casual conversation for six years in a row in the Marist Poll. More people are finding it irksome – 43 percent – compared to 38 percent in 2013 and 32 percent in 2012.

Here are a few more tidbits from the Marist Poll:

  • Americans younger than 30 are the least likely to be perturbed by hearing ‘whatever.’
  • ‘Selfie’ earned the dubious distinction of being the most overused word in 2014.
  • 27 percent of those polled say ‘hashtag is the most worn-out word.

Find out more about annoying words and dubious distinctions at the Marist Poll website.

meet marsala

marsala-cropIf your mind goes immediately to wine, we understand. Ours did when we heard that Marsala is the color of the year for 2015, so named by the Pantone Color Institute®.

In fact, the wine Marsala inspired the choice of this warm reddish-brown color, according to Leatrice Eiseman, the Institute’s executive director.

“Much like the fortified wine that gives Marsala its name,” she says, “this tasteful hue embodies the satisfying richness of a fulfilling meal, while its grounding red-brown roots emanate a sophisticated, natural earthiness.”

Wow! As always, the color of the year pops up in everything from table linens to tote bags to toaster ovens. Notes Eiseman, “This hearty, yet stylish tone is universally appealing and translates easily to fashion, beauty, industrial design, home furnishings and interiors.”

Our art director and resident color expert, Kim Smith, embraces this year’s choice. She says, “Marsala is rich and sophisticated and is sure to play well with other colors! I am excited to give it a try, pairing it with colors such as a pale grey blue, a bright green or a warm taupe. Fun!”

how much does that cost?

Question-depends
Clients ask us this question often and our initial answer is usually the same: It depends. It’s a truthful answer that leads us to the next step, which is a discussion with the client about budget and goals.

Quite simply, cost is relative to what we need to do to achieve desired results. We don’t use a cookie-cutter approach to develop creative or establish costs. We always start with a plan accompanied by our best estimate.

We take pride in being able to work with budgets of all sizes, to squeeze the most out of the dollars our clients entrust to us. We plan and spend as if those dollars were our own.

Big ideas don’t have to cost big bucks. See what we mean by clicking on Creative at the top of this page.