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where do ideas come from?

ideas-blog

In creative brainstorming, we say no idea is a bad idea. Every idea came from somewhere and deserves consideration.

James Webb Young, a copywriter of renown in the early years of advertising, devised a practice for generating ideas. In the 1940s, he wrote it all down for others in advertising. Eventually his wisdom became a published book called, “A Technique for Producing Ideas.”

Here’s an overview of his process:

  1. Gather “raw material.” This includes anything specific to the project or challenge at hand, as well as general knowledge.
  2. Think hard about the problem. Try various combinations of the elements to create a workable solution. Young said you need to “feel your way” though each bit of knowledge that you gathered. He advised working yourself “to a standstill,” meaning keep at it until you believe you have exhausted every option.
  3. Allow everything to incubate. Take a break and let your unconscious mind go to work. Young suggests that you turn your attention to “whatever stimulates your imagination and emotions.” Neuroscientists have conducted research that shows the brain is hard at work in the time right before an insight or idea comes to light.
  4. Welcome the “Eureka!” moment. The perfect idea, the right answer, the ideal solution comes to you, as if from nowhere. But in reality, you had been thinking about it on some level all along.
  5. Develop the idea further and let it take flight. Test, edit and polish it.

In Young’s view, the most important principle in his little book (it’s just 48 pages) is this: “An idea is nothing more, nor less, than a new combination of old elements.” We think that this charming perspective has never grown old.

More information: http://techniqueforproducingideas.com

 

logo size

logo.absolutely

We make sure client logos are sized appropriately for how and where they will be viewed – in a print or online ad, on a billboard, in a TV commercial. Your logo is your signature. We know how important it is. It needs to be noticed without overwhelming the message or the offer.

See how we adapted one client’s logo for a variety of media, including an 18-wheeler!

Suzette loves her new look, thanks!

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“In a word AWESOME! Love the new look! You and your staff are the best!!”

– ­Suzette M. Cover, National Sales Director, Registry for Excellence

What has Suzette so thrilled? We had just redesigned her company’s logo and created a new brochure and trade show pull-up banners. The material makes a great impression, unique and professional.